Sunday, January 31, 2016

Black History Moment

Dr. Carter G. Woodson, the father of Black History, pioneered “Negro History Week” in February 1926. The celebration of our history cannot and should not be relegated to a week or even one month a year. Instead of asking you to respond to a poll this week, I invite you to share your personal Black History moment of your lifetime here on TanyaFree.com




Comments

1. Lee said...

I had the honor of attending the inauguration of the first African-American governor of any state since Reconstruction.Lawrence Douglas Wilder served as the 66th Governor of Virginia from 1990 to 1994.

2. Long Time Listener in Richmond said...

Watching my Father vote for the first time to elect President Barack Obama

3. Mac said...

My daughter becoming the first in our family to earn a degree

4. Grace said...

Casting my vote for President Obama

5. RobertBrown said...

I have been listening (and nowwatching) your show since the early days.You are an example of Black History in our community.Your show and presence has grown,but your purpose has never waned.You probably don't get a lot of thank yous,but you have made history here in Richmond and now nationally.

6. Long Time Listener said...

Started my own family business

7. Anonymous said...

Black History Moment in the making May 2016.My daughter will receive her doctorate in Psychology.

8. Jerome said...

Meeting the great civil rights attorney Oliver Hill

9. Cameron said...

This is such a great and thoughtful gesture. Not sure if I have contributed to history YET.But I will.Thanks for the inspiration.

10. James C. Coleman said...

Last week I had the opportunity to be a part of your platform. I left feeling little angry but yet inspired to find the words to express to the gentleman who made a comment in what appeared to me supporting some of the slave owners and how good they treated their slave. This remind me of a book by Susan Pendleton Lee: " Primary School of History of the United States (1897) " Benefit of Evils of Slavery. The ignorant heathen African had been greatly benefit by their two hundred and fifty years of slavery. Thousand and Thousand of them had become civilized and Christianized. The comment by the gentleman reminded me of the quote above. Such writing delved deeply into the essence of humanity and set forth poignant lesson for all to live by. As I listen to the comment I was reminded of the bigoted and distorted beliefs that some individuals has been brain wash. Superficially, I have learned that comments such as the one that were made was wrong. More deeply, I gathered that perspective is a powerful thing. It can color and contrast the way individual perceive not only history, but life. Susan Pendleton Lee was a Virginia that greatly sympathized with the "plight" of the South. She, like many others, was socialized to believe that the system of slavery was valuable. As I set in silence listening the comment, I began to wonder what had influence the gentleman to believe the falsehoods that he stated. It frighten me that the truth could be clouded by the society in which one lives. I pray that my comments perhaps will reveal a the truth. There are no benefits to slavery. The comment echoes the white man's burden to prove or justify his sins of slavery. The comment made is proof that bias still exist. My advise to all that hear similar comment listen with a discerning ear.



Post Your Comments

Name
URL
Email
(Note: Email address is NOT published!)
Remember Me
Comments

CAPTCHA Reload
Write the characters in the image above